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of interesting characters, including a u.s. intelligence agent named brooke chanda who may or may not save the day. mr. patterson was a lawyer before becoming a writer concert at one point as assistant attorney general for the state of ohio. he also worked as a lawyer for the securities and exchange commission that he has been chairman of the organization common cause and has written for such publications as the times of london and the "washington post." many of his works have been international sellers, and i daresay that "the devil's light" will join that list. is welcome richard north patterson. [applause] >> it's great to see you and to have read your book, "the devil's light" doesn't refer to osama bin laden's flashlight but to the light emitted from a nuclear weapon. and this is a very serious subject, and people who know your career will not be surprised that you have tackled this subject. your other books, for example, eclipse was a human rights, africa and the geopolitics loyal and her previous books, exile and before that was about the israeli-palestinian conflict. you are known
into dollars today for organizations, the greater public support down the road. >> host: arthur brooks, head of aei has endorsed her book. what is your relationship with ati or arthur brooks? >> guest: arthur has been a friend and a mentor of mine for many years. one of the nice about this book is that he's concerned about issues of poverty in america and how we help poor people. what i want to do is write a book that would not just connect to a broader array of individuals and organizations that work in this area. many of those are faith-based organizations. arthur understands how critical that factor is to the work we do and as you mentioned place suggestions as they structured the survey move forward. >> host: you are a professor at the university of chicago. what iraq? what you teach? >> guest: if a school social worker between thousands of students to be part tensioners, counselors to serve millions of americans over the course of all their careers. i teach courses on the history of the welfare state. i also teach courses on issues of poverty in the spring and teach in a new on non-prof
public support down the road. >> arthur brooks, head of aei, has endorsed the book. what's your relationship with aei or with arthur brooks? >> i don't have any formal relationship with aei. he has been a friend and mentor of mine for many years. one of the nice things about this book is that it's concerned about issues of poverty. and how we help poor people. what i want to do is write a book that would not disconnect to academic audiences but connect to a broader array of individuals and organizations that working as a big many of those are nonprofit, faith-based organizations. arthur is an expert on the nonprofit sector and understands how critical that sector is to the work we do. he has provided inside the insight, suggestions. >> you're a professor at the university of chicago. what department? >> i'm in the school of social service which celebrate its hundred year a year ago. it's a school social work. we trained thousands of students to be practitioners and counselors at one serve millions of americans over the course of all their careers. i teach courses on the history
, but a brookings study, for example -- there was a wonderful book called "rights at work" that came out a couple of years ago by brookings, and what you do is you compare accident rates and death rates, and the accident rates and the death rates are somewhat different than they were 20 years ago. one's up a little and one's down a little, but basically the numbers are the same. c-span: who wrote the occupational health and safety act? >> guest: congress wrote the act. c-span: what party or what politician, what side? >> guest: much of the federal regulation came out of the great society, including worker safety laws, and there is a story about worker safety laws which i'm not sure is in the book or not actually. it was at one point. but most people, most americans -- and i would argue very strongly in favor of worker safely laws. all the sweat shops, the horrible child labor abuses of the turn of the century, the lincoln steffens-exposed abuses, occurred because there were no laws, and so everyone quickly slipped down to the level of the greediest manufacturer, because whoever the mean-spirited
of deliberation, statesmanship and compromise. "the new york times" columnist david brooks, who is a conservative columnist, recently wrote that too many republicans seem to have joined a movement -- his word -- in which -- quote -- "the members do not accept the logic of compromise, no matter what the terms." close quote. i hope that some of our republican colleagues will prove mr. brooks wrong on this matter because of its huge significance. the time for ignoring hard truths is over. blind resistance to compromise may play well with some, but it is no way to solve hard problems or to govern. drawing lines in the sand and issuing ultimatums may make for ringing sound bites, but no press release ever sent a child to college or gave a working family hope for a good job. why republican colleagues cannot bring themselves to support the majority leader's proposal or at least the proposed modifications to it, they can vote no. but it is unthinkable to filibuster against allowing the senate an opportunity to vote on the reid measure itself as this clock approaches midnight. it is one thing to vote agai
? and bruce who does books for the brookings press at that time was thinking through the firstenergy paper on of guinness and into bruce told less the ghost of vietnam walk the corridors of the white house every day. >> period explain to me how would is those close can affect different presidents in such extraordinarily different fashion. for example,, a jimmy carter trying to go into iran to rescue the hostages and up with a disaster on his hands. thing you have george h. to be bush who you just said send 500,000 troops into iraq and kuwait. theoretically the same lessons to be drawn but yet here are president's trying diametrically opposed. >> the same lessons but different people functioning with different political climate's and to see issues in different ways. the ada to see it one way and a democrat another is abc but what i find especially interesting is as the years go bayou would think the war ended in 1975 why does it bother me today? but it is. how you respond as an individual depends on the politics of the moment somebody may feel you have to go in full bore sending in many mor
coulter, michael moore, david brooks. thanks for being with us, here's more booktv. >> are new but, the best of battles and leaders of the civil war. abraham lincoln was, as he told the council of generals that he convened at the white house, greatly disturbed by the state of affairs. the treasury was nearly exhausted. public credit was operating. congress was full of jack depends, as he said. foreign relations were perilous. spending more time fighting each other than the confederates in missouri and these. the general was sick in bed with typhoid fever, incommunicado. the army still make is inspiring his famous comment. if general mcclellan did not want to use the army may be can bar for a while. if something was not done send he confided the bottom would be out of the whole affair. 1862 may have been in no way the most dizzying year of the war. before it was over the in that better than worse than better than worse. within its roller-coaster of triumph and disaster abraham lincoln did nothing less then transformed the war for union into a war for union freedom. that was a pretty
says send it to gwendolyn brooks. you know who she is. the poet laureate of illinois. we will send it to her. she teaches at such and such college and i sent it to her and a few months later she called me in to her office and said look, young man, i don't know what you intend to do with your life but you ought to be a writer. that made an impression on me. so from their, i read defined myself and went on to become a columnist for the chicago sun times at the age of 19 and might have once at. >> we both know clarence page is very well. wonderful story how he got hired on the chicago tribune with 1969, westside gone up in flames and chicago tribune revenues room to find out who they could send who knew the west side and there was nobody. clarence gets hired. did you have a similar experience getting into the business? >> not exactly but i got in on the the same energy. beginning with a 1965 riot you are talking about the time when for reasons we should not go into in depth most major metropolitan newspapers saw no need to higher anybody black some most of them didn't have anybody bla
said send it to gwendolyn brooks, you know what it is. i said that is of fort lauderdale illinois. she teaches at such and such college. so i send it to hurt and a few months later i heard from her. she called me and she said look, young man, i don't know what you intend to do with your life and you ought to be a writer and that made something of an impression on me. [laughter] so from there it totally redefined myself and i went on to become a columnist for the chicago ton vv kurson times and might have was set. >> we both know clarence page very well. he tells the story how he got hired on "the chicago tribune" when the 1969 west side gone up in flames the tribune looked around the newsroom to find out who they could send who knew the west side and there was nobody. clemens gets hired. did you have a similar experience getting into the business? >> not exactly but i think i got in on some of that same energy. the beginning was the 1965 riot. you're talking about a time when for reasons we probably need not go into in depth needed to become most see no need to hire anybody black so th
michael schirmer talks about the believing brain. robert kaufman will be on in two hours and arthur brooks will talk about his book the battle. in four hours the discussion between saudi pipe and grace turner on obamacare. and stephen more discussing the pros and con the public unions. .. from jacksonville there is a billboard on i-95 that says, who is john gall to? may be our next speaker will be able to explain to us. you heard our all-star prediction panel yesterday, you know there were fireworks. well, don laden's was the gentleman who lit the first match and got things really going. he is, if you read the program notes, an avid believer in technology. what happens if it stops jack anyway, to tell us today what the future could be, please join me in welcoming don luskins on "i am john galt." [applause] >> they keep. -- thank-you. thank you for that great introduction. one substantial inaccuracy. i actually am john glat. [laughter] but you all are to. that is the secret. her books are lessons, self-help books, guides to how to live. we can all be john glat. we can all be heroes, just re
and allies thought that he had gone too far. but preston brooks who was his cousin was a member of congress, and he together with a lot of southern congressmen decided they had to do something about sumner. .. >> we have a saying about strom thurmond, just go off a bit on the, they pulled off the submarine from charleston harbor, one of the artifacts they pulled off was reelected strom thurmond. [laughter] >> is an old joke about a good joke. in any event, the caning of sumner which was read with great enthusiasm in the south lead to horror in the north. the people in the north are going what is going on with these, in the insane southerners? we oppose slavery, they will beat us like slaves? in other words, the common man in the north now rising up to look at the arrogance of what they called slave power. slave power meanwhile, is trying to protect their rights. you have irresistible forces and the immovable object. they would have lincoln douglas debates and demand john brown -- john brown started the war, in my view. there's a book out about john brown. john brown attacked harpers ferry.
rivalries. michigan has ohio state. alabama has auburn. the heritage foundation and the brookings institution. harvard had yale. remember, the ivy league is not an athletic conference. in 18 '06 to play the second ever football game. the weather was lousy. it was cold. the winds were so strong that ships could it be the harbor. roosevelt shivered on the sidelines that day. as he watched the game, the sport he saw was quite different from the one we know today. there were no quarterbacks. there were no wide receivers. there were no forward passes. football was in its infancy. before play began, the captains from the two teams met to discuss the rules they would play by. what would count for a score, how many people would be on the field at a time. they were like school kids at recess talking about where the sidelines would be, how to count blitzes, whether they played touched or tackle. this is what they did before that game. when it came to football, harvard was the teacher and yale was the student. just a few years before that came in 1876, harvard sent yale and elongated ball be
, well, send it to quinlan brooks.of fo send it to her. she teaches at such and sucha college. i sent it to her. she said, look, young man, i don't know what you intend to d with your life, but you ought ti be a writer. that made something of an impression on me.essi on and so from their that ended upt totally redefining myself. i went on to become a columnistu for the chicago sun-times at the age of 19. my past was sort of said.e w >> we both know clarence very well. he tells a wonderful story aboue hiw he got hired on the chicago to be in. i 1969, the west side, gone up in flames. looked around the newsroom toi find that to the consent to actually knew the co west side,w there was nobody. parents get hired. did you have a similar kind of experience in getting into theto business? >> not exactly. but i got in on some of that same energy. i mean the beginning, the 1965,i you are talking about a time when for reasons repro will need not go into, major metropolitan newspapers, hire anybody black. and so most of them didn't have anybody black on staff. and the l.a. times will notice this
couple months on booktv, ann coulter, michael moore, david brooks. thanks for being with us, here's more booktv. >> you can find out about upcoming booktv weekend programs like "in depth "by using your mobile phone. simply text the word "book" to 99702 to receive a weekly e-mail about our schedule. and sign up now for a chance to receive a signed copy of linda hogan's book, "people of the whale." standard message and data rates apply. .. >> before we begin, i want to just say that this is the momentous time for politics and prose. as you know, i'm david cohen, who is carla cohen's husband. she and barbara meade, together with the stellar star here at politics and prose, you the very enbeiged and articulate lovers of books and ideas and the community of writers, publishers, editors, agents have made politics and prose into more than a bricks and motar bookstore. it is a thriving community institution, it's a setting for the discussion of and dissemination of ideas and howard public space where people meet, talk, discuss, and do it in a civil way. and it will continue that way under the le
with brooke chancellor. >> those were the fun scenes. i want to point out they, are there. [laughter] >> it gets into quite a few scenes with them but like real life, the politics and so forth and they talk about different things but the question from the audience is how, one of the questions is how influential israel is to the foreign policy and in terms of this book, can you talk about that because you do explore that issue in the book. >> in terms of the proposition placed on the nuclear terrorism they are both concerned about it and ought to be an televisa i think for example and israel defense geography and its infrastructure and all the rest and certainly the structure of new york and washington and the futures of the democracy and commitment to the middle east and civil liberties and all the rest, so we both have a profound concern with mutual terrorism but they are concerned about them and we are concerned about us as a first proposition and then there's a history distrust between the cia and the mossad feeling on behalf of the u.s. sometimes to manipulate us to our in-house
brooke won the war, 2008. and now we have "the storm of war: a new history of the second world war." which was released in the u.k. and was the number two bestseller on the london times book review list. and mr. roberts claims to be 48 years old. this is up for considerable debate. either he is about 70, with a lifetime backdrop of research which allows him to put out a new book every year or two, or he runs an empire called roberts incorporated which is an intellectual selection -- sweatshop with a bunch of elves in the back room. there appears to be no other explanations of this level of productivity in terms of his output. like all andrew roberts' books, and i've a number of them in my shelf, i've never bought them, i've never gotten a discount, this one is a page turner. it gives us the viewpoint of hitler and his generals. and andrew is trying to answer the really big question that has haunted historians, and many others, for the last 70 years. why did germany lose the war? was at the superiority of the allied powers? or was it strategic errors on hitler's part? in fact with a
in the next couple months on booktv, ann coulter, michael moore, david brooks. thanks for being with us, here's more booktv.
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17